Weekly Wind Down

Collaborative content, written, edited, and produced by members of the KAMP Student Radio


The Past Week in History

Written by: Fabiana Delgadillo

Published: December 2, 2021


In Paris, France, a prominent artist was born on December 2, 1859. Georges Pierre Seurat was a French post-Impressionist artist. He is well known for pioneering the neo-impressionism movement. Neo-impressionism is characterized by the usage of optical mixtures of light and colors. ‘A Sunday Afternoon on the Island of La Grande Jatte’ is one of his more famous paintings. This painting uses a technique called ‘pointillism’. Seurat himself was accredited to its creation. Pointillism is the practice of applying many small colored dots and at a distance, all those dots would visually blend together. George Pierre Seurat was a prevalent figure in the neo-impressionist movement.


Written by: Kira Mclure

Published: December 2, 2021


On December 2nd, 1927, the Ford Model A was introduced to the public for the first


time. The successor to the venerable Model T, The Model A was packed with features that,


while basic by modern standards, where quite advanced for the time. The vehicle had drum


brakes on all four wheels, a 40 horsepower engine that could be started with the power of


electricity (instead of by hand), and a manual transmission that boasted 3 forward gears.


Over 4.3 million units where produced during the Model As production run, spanning from


1927 to 1931.


The Past Week on Campus

Written by: Alex Sanchez

Published: December 2, 2021


Earlier in the year, KAMP News did a piece on the UA Young Dems, a club of young Democrats here on campus. With a new club president, Miles Stone Blakely, and all the officers also being new, there was a lot of work ahead as they set to re-establish themselves here on campus. Only having a handful of members since 2019 they got to work right away recruiting new members. They gained 50+ new members just during this fall semester. Huge gains were made in regards to the number of members but with Miles Stone Blakely graduating next semester he is looking to pass on leadership to Alyssa Sanchez.

Alyssa plans on continuing what Miles had set up and grow the UA Young Dems even further. There are several reasons for students to join the club such as: internship opportunities, being able to meet local officials, and making new friends on campus with a similar political background. Steps will also be taken to have more turnout for events, something the Young Dems said they needed to improve on. Alyssa is looking to offer for people to come to the meetings in-person and through zoom. Also, establish a Discord for the members to talk and socialize. She had also mentioned that she wants more social events for the Young Dems next semester. The club is currently having its only social event of the semester coming up on December 16th, a Mario Kart tournament at SUMC. With a new ambitious president about to take the helm, keep the UA Young Dems on your radar for up-and-coming clubs here on campus!



The Past Week Nationally

Written by: Rhiannon Shae Cox

Published: December 2, 2021


Detection of the COVID-19 Omicron Variant in the United States

While many Americans are getting vaccinated and going without masks, a new

COVID-19 variant has been discovered. Initially found in South Africa, the omicron

variant has spread to 24 countries, including the United States. The first case of the

variant was reported in San Francisco, California after a person returned from South

Africa. Currently the patient is quarantining and is experiencing mild symptoms. They

are expected to fully recover. Omicron has also been reported in Colorado and

Minnesota. The Colorado patient had just returned from a trip to various countries in

southern Africa, while the Minnesota patient had come from a convention in New York

City. Officials in Minnesota and New York are working to trace the variant in their states.

These patients are also experiencing mild symptoms and are currently quarantining. All

three patients had been fully vaccinated against COVID-19, but had not received their

boosters. In an effort to prevent further spread of the omicron variant, the United States

has restricted travel from Botswana, Eswatini, Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia,

South Africa, and Zimbabwe.



Written by: David Aguilera

Published: December 2, 2021

On the Omicron COVID-19 Variant


As the pandemic advances into 2022, concerns over a new variant of COVID-19 have risen, with cases all over the world concerning authorities. This new variant was first documented in South Africa, where a family of four exhibit unusual symptoms, such as extreme fatigue, alongside the normal COVID symptoms. On November 18, Dr. Angelique Coetzee informed South Africa’s vaccine advisory committee about the situation, rising concern over the unvaccinated and the elderly. Most of the symptoms associated with this variant are less prominent and therefore could be harder to identify. For instance, none of the patients so far have lost their sense of taste and smell. As of today, there have been about two dozen cases of the variant that are all Dr. Coetzee’s patients, with around half of them being unvaccinated. The World Health Organization officially identified the variant and named it Omicron on November 26th. The WHO alerts that Omicron poses a very high and serious global risk, and urges travel restrictions to be tightened. Several countries around the world reacted by setting temporary stricter travel restrictions, with the US especially focusing on restricting travel from South Africa. The Biden administration has contributed to these restrictions further by requiring international travelers to present a negative COVID-19 test result 24 hours before entering into the country. Despite these efforts, Omicron cases have been confirmed in varying locations across the world, with European countries identifying relatively recently. Soon after, cases were documented in Canada and the United States. Cases of Omicron have been confirmed in Colorado, Minnesota and California. Some of the concerns revolving around Omicron are not able to be resolved at this early stage, for instance, knowing whether it may cause more severe disease.


The Past Week Internationally

Written by: Sophie Carlisle Applin

Published: December 2, 2021


As the pandemic advances into 2022, concerns over a new variant of COVID-19 have risen, with cases all over the world concerning authorities. This new variant was first documented in South Africa, where a family of four exhibit unusual symptoms, such as extreme fatigue, alongside the normal COVID symptoms. On November 18, Dr. Angelique Coetzee informed South Africa’s vaccine advisory committee about the situation, rising concern over the unvaccinated and the elderly. Most of the symptoms associated with this variant are less prominent and therefore could be harder to identify. For instance, none of the patients so far have lost their sense of taste and smell. As of today, there have been about two dozen cases of the variant that are all Dr. Coetzee’s patients, with around half of them being unvaccinated. The World Health Organization officially identified the variant and named it Omicron on November 26th. The WHO alerts that Omicron poses a very high and serious global risk, and urges travel restrictions to be tightened. Several countries around the world reacted by setting temporary stricter travel restrictions, with the US especially focusing on restricting travel from South Africa. The Biden administration has contributed to these restrictions further by requiring international travelers to present a negative COVID-19 test result 24 hours before entering into the country. Despite these efforts, Omicron cases have been confirmed in varying locations across the world, with European countries identifying relatively recently. Soon after, cases were documented in Canada and the United States. Cases of Omicron have been confirmed in Colorado, Minnesota and California. Some of the concerns revolving around Omicron are not able to be resolved at this early stage, for instance, knowing whether it may cause more severe disease.


For more information on the above stories visit the links below:

Historical:

https://www.tate.org.uk/art/art-terms/n/neo-impressionism

https://www.theartstory.org/artist/seurat-georges/

https://www.britannica.com/art/pointillism

https://corporate.ford.com/articles/history/the-1928-ford-model-a.html

https://www.macsmotorcitygarage.com/december-2-1927-the-model-a-ford-is-introduced/

https://haynes.com/en-us/tips-tutorials/chilton-answers-what-s-difference-between-ford-model-t-and-model

National:

https://www.npr.org/2021/12/01/1059835937/omicron-us-first-case https://www.npr.org/sections/coronavirus-live-updates/2021/12/02/1060883099/minneso ta-omicron-variant-confirmed-new-york-city-traveler

https://www.npr.org/2021/11/29/1059772335/us-restricts-international-travel-over-omicro n-variant

https://www.cnn.com/2021/12/01/health/us-omicron-variant-confirmed-case/index.html

https://nypost.com/2021/11/27/omicron-variant-symptoms-unusual-but-mild-says-south-african-doctor/

https://www.cnn.com/2021/11/26/health/omicron-variant-what-we-know/index.html

https://news.yahoo.com/first-case-omicron-variant-found-130104653.html?fr=sycsrp_catchall

https://news.yahoo.com/omicron-cases-confirmed-3-u-214715369.html?fr=sycsrp_catchall


International:

https://www.who.int/news/item/28-11-2021-update-on-omicron

https://www.cnn.com/2021/12/01/health/us-omicron-variant-confirmed-case/index.html

https://nypost.com/2021/11/27/omicron-variant-symptoms-unusual-but-mild-says-south-african-doctor/

https://www.cnn.com/2021/11/26/health/omicron-variant-what-we-know/index.html

https://news.yahoo.com/first-case-omicron-variant-found-130104653.html?fr=sycsrp_catchall

https://news.yahoo.com/omicron-cases-confirmed-3-u-214715369.html?fr=sycsrp_catchall



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